THE LAST CHAPTER (Tribute to Klas ’14 Champions)

1The force physicists call friction couldn’t stop us; the force physicists call gravitation couldn’t pull us down. In our thoughts, we were like poles, but didn’t repel one another.

I hate reading exciting books-only to find out that the last chapter has been torn out. This is the last chapter and is intact. A writer of modern times observed: “the greatest part of mankind employ their first years to make their last miserable.” But, no we employed our last year (5th year) in the University to make it remarkable.

September 14, 2014 remains a day that won’t be forgotten in a hurry. It was the day we were crowned champions of the very prestigious klas ’14 tournament. That lone goal in the final was just enough to make the supposed impossible, possible. I remember vividly, the manner in which late injured substitute; Abidemi Adeagbo (a striker I could well rate above Arsenal’s Oliver Giroud) cut and drove in from the left flank into the 18-yard box to unleash the winning strike, which took everyone to the empyrean limit of excitement. The atmosphere was electrifying! At the blast of the final whistle, it was even more electrifying. Sky blue jerseys and tops filled the arena. What a day! What a moment of celebration! To tell the truth, I was afraid we were going to be disappointed. To think that the ‘jackometers’ left their books to come give their support. It would have been unfair to them if we had lost. But, most importantly, it would have been quite unfair to the entire team (including the team physiotherapist, media officer, team pastor and the faithful supporters). But, how did we get that far? At this point let me give some credit where is due and give props to you-know-who8

THE TEAM

  1. Babatunde Adegoke (GK): Great goalkeeper, although very playful or do I just say Unserious. He was between the sticks during the first game and I think one other game. He missed a couple of training sessions, but was influential in the success.
  2. Jamiu Ajao (GK): First choice keeper. He made so many great saves throughout the tournament. Especially in the matches against PMT and MEE. By merit, the goal keeper of the tournament. He kept a clean sheets in all matches
  3. Abiodun Obanla (LB/RB): He started in left back in the first game. He made vital interceptions and left everyone wondering how come a politician could play so well. He featured in about two games throughout the tournament because of his political assignments, which made him miss training on many occasions.
  4. James Azibolanari Ben (RB): Solid in defence and did very well when called up to feature in games. He did very well in the full right back position. He is a rock!
  5. Opeoluwa Dada(RB/CB): Tall and good in the air. He played the central defence role in the first game, but the coach had to deploy him to RB in subsequent games. Injury couldn’t allow him feature in majority of matches. His overall performance was good, except in the game against MEE where he kept slipping and could have cost us the game. So he was pulled off and didn’t feature in the final.
  6. Victor Akinsumade (RB): He featured in only three games. The last three games of the tournament. He strengthened the team and showed us he was truly a professional. I remember the head coach deployed him to Centre midfield against MEE to stop their attacking flow and did well in stopping MEE’s key player from operating. He was very key to our success.
  7. Festus Dare (LB): He joined training late. A natural midfielder, but sacrificed that to operate on left of defense throughout the tournament. He was a perfect replacement of Obanla. His movement upfront to support Abbey Lincoln was massive for the team. Strong and fast on the ball. He could well be the long awaited replacement of Evra at Manchester United.
  8. David Onwe (CB): I hope I have the right words to describe him. He was just too fantastic. He was always early to training. He was there for us all through the tournament. He played every minute of every game. Forgive me if I say we couldn’t have won it without him.
  9. Damola Fafure (CB): Nickname-Shizzule. Before the tournament, most people only saw him as a fine boy (if you know what I mean) and a graphics designer. CEO of Shizzule Graphics House (SGH). A very popular graphics artist in the University. I remember, once our opponents laughed when they saw him in defense, saying “he think sey na handbill we dey design for here?” he proved them wrong. He was solid in defense. What do you think of the back flip of the ball that was already behind him, with a striker charging him in the game against PMT? That was world class! Everyone was unhappy when the team physiotherapist declared him unfit for the final due to ankle injury. In the end, we won it for him.
  10. Femi Adeloye(DMF): He’s not just about his infectious laughter. He was our strength in the middle. He had a goal to his credit (A well taken shot from outside the 18-yard box). Except for the game against Computer Science, where he had to be rested, he played every other minute of the tournament. Salsa, as he is fondly called because of his amazing drumming talent, was just too hot for opponents to handle. His partnership with the team captain Olutoba Jetawo was made in heaven!
  11. Tolulope Richard: he attended a couple of training sessions, but didn’t feature in any game. Great defender, but wasn’t in the coach’s plan.
  12. Olutoba Jetawo (CMF/DMF): Captain Fantastic! Team captain, leader, project mate and good friend. I had always known him from first year in the University. Accurate passer of the ball. His overall performance was fantastic. He also had a couple of goals to his credit including the winner against CSP in the round of 8. Although, he later found the game difficult and was nowhere to be found. This forced the coach to pull him out for the first time in the tournament. For the rest of the tournament, he couldn’t play at his peak.
  13. Stephen Oladipo (LWF/RWF): Sobriquet-Yungstar love this guy (#no_homo). His commitment was top notch. I kept saying to myself “Yungstar mustn’t be letdown”. He was always the first to report to training. Even when his project supervisor gave him problems, he made it. A talented and well known singer on campus. He’s not all about the music afterall. He did well on the flanks. He operated both on the left and right flanks. Although, he rarely played full matches, but made great impacts. His commitment won him a first team place.
  14. Michael Balogun (RWF): Not tall, but dangerous on the ball. He started the tournament and showed much commitment, but wasn’t available for many matches due to injury. Then, just before the final, was fully fit again. He did very well in the last training session and that earned him a starting shirt in the final. Although, he was substituted for Gbenga Ogunwo (PAGO) as he couldn’t connect to the aerial balls and was isolated from the front line.
  15. Gbenga Ogunwo: to many fans, he was the man of the match in the final. He replaced Michael late on in the game and ran the architecture defence ragged. His pace was too much for them. And many questioned our decision not to start him. Great player, I must say. I always saw that in training. He can play as a striker up front or as a right wing forward.
  16. Abbey Lincoln: Lanky forward. He played virtually every game. Although not every minute. Coach Ebuka particularly saw something in him that a lot of people couldn’t see. He always played to instruction. Fast on the ball and a very good marker of opponents.
  17. Adeolu Batisan: I should spell his name as BATISAN. Wow! What a guy! He’s good with both feet. He’s humble, disciplined, committed and… I don’t have the right words. I interrupted his reading session of Atomic Spectroscopy (PHY 518) to invite him to the team. He’s just too good. How could we have won it without him? His partnership with Wilson and Bidemi was out of this world.
  18. Wilson Arege: Tall, strong and very good with the ball. Nobody does it better. He’s very good in the air. Although not a good goal scorer, yet was always a threat to any defense. That was why he got a kick on his chest in the 2nd round game against PMT. He had to be changed. The opponents clearly wanted him out. Kudos must go to the Coach whose decision to play him (a natural midfielder) up front as a striker was question, but in the end, everyone knew why.
  19. Abidemi Usman Adeagbo: “Bidex, I’m watching you!” those were my frequent words to him. Although very lazy off the pitch, but great on the field of play. His attitude towards training was poor. I warned him severally that there was no automatic shirt for anyone. I think he played only one full match, but was our best striker no doubt. He was often injured. But, that didn’t stop him from being the tournament’s highest goal scorer racking up a total of 6 goals. He scored in every group game. He came into the final injured. We had no choice and had to risk him because we trusted his abilities. Hence, his inclusion. He did it. That goal! Yes that goal that crowned us champions was off his boot.11

THE COACH

When the tournament was announced, only few people showed interest in it. Understandably so, because playing football or winning a match was never our stuff. Right from 1st year, it had never gone well. Losing out in the first round had always been our modus operandi, but, Ebuka Gerard Paschal Nwadike made the difference. He started the campaign, gingering guys and assuring them that we could do it with focus, unity and determination. Need I tell you that Ebuka is also someone who detests failure in whatever quarter? A first-class by all standards; failure is never his stuff. I knew that already, so I didn’t hesitate to be his assistant and be a part of his success. When things were falling apart and complacency was setting in as a result of the victory against PMT in the round of 16, he gave a powerful speech which brought everyone back to his senses. He said and I’ll summarize: “There are certain things that will stop a man from achieving his dreams. Everyone needs to know his weakness. If yours is women, you should check it; if it’s alcohol, reduce it. And if someone is advising you and you choose not to listen, you’re only harming yourself. The problem with most of us is that we are proud”. He continued, “if we’re not careful, we will lose the game against CSP. We have to change our mentality and stop underrating anyone .” he then flashed our minds back to how we felt when we lost our first game of the tournament against AEE. In the end the match against CSP proved to be very difficult and had it not been for the speech we might have lost it. I won’t be able to go into details, but there was too much eloquence and seriousness in his voice for a moron to miss the hint.

THE MANAGER

Paul Anibaba started the whole thing. He bought us the form and followed up the schedules. He was there all through. He attended a couple of training sessions. He started the building of the team in our first year. Up Pepsi!

THE TEAM MEDIA OFFICER

Godwin Otah did very well with ensuring no one was left in oblivion of the happenings. His posts on social media made everyone a part of it.

THE TEAM PHYSIOTHERAPIST

Edidiong Ekpe did quite well for himself and the team. He was there all through the tournament and ensured every player was in good shape.

THE TEAM PASTOR

Victor Oviangbede was there all through, in body and in Spirit. The passion could be seen on his face all through. His prayers did it.

15THE FAITHFUL SUPPORTERS

  1. Oyinkansola Onipede: She was always there. In the final, she was clad in a yello Arsenal away jersey
  2. Ranti Bademosi: Same as Oyin. I remember she once provided glucose for the team. Great personality
  3. Dina: He attended most training sessions and matches to cheer up the boys.
  4. Olusola Ewaregbemi: Painthinkin. Devoted supporter. I remember very well how he did the shouting during matches. He was the coach, the player, the referee,… he was everything.
  5. Johnson Gbenga: He also made himself available on many occasions: training and matches
  6. Omoboyeje Oyesanmi: a great tutor who made himself available during training despite his commitments at RCF. He played in one of the trainings and did quite well.
  7. Kehinde Bankole: What a passionate guy. Great supporter all through.
  8. Samuel Obadero: Great class representative. He covered for us and ensured we didn’t enter Dr. E.O Ogolo’s bad book. He also attended virtually every game.

Dr. Oluyamo is definitely not forgotten. He came to support us in the finals

In the end, the tournament taught me so much. It goes a long way in confirming that anyone could achieve anything in life with humility, hard work (we trained more than any other team), focus, dedication, determination and unity (when in group). We weren’t favorites, but with all those attributes, we made it. Of course by God’s grace.

13

I hope we all are adding these features to our lives in our different locations. If you haven’t please, start now. You will achieve anything with those. I miss everyone. See you at the top.14

THE OFFICIAL EMOTION

Written by: Jephthah ‘Sola Iyaro and Edidiong Ekpe

anxietyAbout ten years ago, lightning struck my home. It was no ordinary lightening; its aftermath was grave such that a mango tree through which it passed became barren. All electrical appliances that were plugged at the time of occurrence were damaged; electric bulbs lit and blew off at the same instant; all insulated wires, about 50 feet away, conveying electricity into the house melted away. Ever since then, whenever it’s cloudy and there are signs of rainfall, I don’t go for clothes spread outside first. Rather, I make straight for all appliances connected to the wall socket because every rainfall now seems to come along with yet another queer lightning. This feeling is called anxiety. Collins (1973) defines anxiety as the official emotion of our age, the most pervasive psychological phenomenon of our time, fully understood by no one, the central problem in understanding and treating mental illness. Anxiety could be caused by several reasons. Mine in the case I just illustrated is from experience. Sometimes, anxiety comes as we learn to think. For instance, several years ago, I would listen to the newscaster and the weather guy with interest admiring the way those English words were spoken and probably repeat after him. Now, those words make a whole lot of sense to me and sometimes news cause anxiety of some sort.

We live in an age where everything is coloured by this universal emotion. Modern technology is producing such rapid and far-reaching changes in our standards of living that some people become anxious simply trying to keep up. Also, the social media and smart phones have made it easy for us immediately to be aware of the problems that are going on in the world around us. Economy melt-down; global warming; upcoming general elections, etc. there are various reasons to be anxious and even when one tries not to be, it is most likely one ends up being anxious. Do you still remember the moment you were to check your UME result? The guy who feels apprehensive whenever he asks a girl for a date, for example, can avoid this anxiety by no dating, but then his solitary life may produce a different kind of anxiety.

Sometimes, we know exactly what gets us anxious while on other occasions we can’t pin-point the cause. You know such free-floating anxiety when you don’t know why you feel as you do. You are afraid something terrible is going to happen, but what it is or what you can do about it remains a mystery. Anxieties, people say are accompanied by physical reactions that can easily be recognized like discomfort in the stomach (“butterflies”) and so on. Okay, I know of loss of appetite, inability to sleep and some are not easily recognizable like changes in blood pressure. When these reactions persist, they may harm us. Of course persistent loss of appetite may lead to stomach ulcer, anorexia and you know the rest.

Source: anxiety-traetments.com

Source: anxiety-treatments.com

Dealing with anxiety is my major concern. One of the ways of coping with anxiety is to joke about it. Just like Basket mouth, the Nigerian comedian recently joked about Igbos getting life jackets following the threat by Oba of Lagos to throw them into the ocean if they didn’t vote for the candidate of his choice. You see, by making light of a situation we can often reduce the tensions and carry on more effectively than we might have done otherwise. Sometimes people cry about a problem and this enables them to let off steam and to feel better at least for a while. Others forget their anxiety temporarily by sleeping, day-dreaming, drowning their anxieties in alcohol and so on. The question is, are those the best solutions? While all these can lessen our feelings of anxiety, it wouldn’t be safe to think they are all equally effective. Most times, they make us shy away from the real problems. The person, who drinks, excessively, for example, may find that this helps to dull the feelings of anxiety but this is done so effectively that the cause of the anxiety may never be dealt with.

Whenever possible, it is best to face up to our anxieties and the situations which produce anxiety, and then try to do something about these problems. Psychology says that a little anxiety is a helpful thing, but the Bible says, “Have no anxiety about anything”. I think the Bible means anxiety in form of fret and worry. Instead of acknowledging God’s sovereignty, we shift the burdens of life onto ourselves and assume that we alone can handle the problems that we face. Paul could honestly write that he wasn’t anxious (that is, plagued with worry) about the possibility of being hungry, in danger, or otherwise persecuted. But he was anxious (that is, concerned) about the churches and welfare of other believers. Likewise we cannot be both committed to Christ and paralyzed by worry and fretful anxiety. But neither should we go through life with a complete lack of concern for the world around us. In all of this, we must trust in Christ to help us with the problem of anxiety as He has promised. Coming to think about it, what else could we do if not by His help?

Reference

Collins Gary, 1973: Overcoming Anxiety, Vision House Publishers, Santa Ana, California 92705, ISBN 0-87801-017-3.

THE TRICKY QUESTION: WHAT CHURCH DO YOU ATTEND?

3This often sounds to me like “How much of a Christian are you?” and it is one question I hardly answer too soon. On many occasions, I rather beg the question while on other occasions when I have to give an answer; it usually takes a long pause. However, this is usually not intended, but happens because at about the same time the question is being asked, a number of thoughts go on in my mind. I ask myself why he/she wants to know. Is it to know how much of a Christian I am? How much I could be trusted? Is it to know how much to avoid me? Is it to tell me how bad a certain Church is? Or perhaps to condemn me out rightly and tell me I’m on my way to hell. Or is it to know whether we could get married if there’s any chance at all?

As simple and ordinary this question could be and if fact should be answered without hesitation, it should be noted that several people attach a lot of meanings to the response they get. Most Christians have come to believe their Church is the best there is, and members of other Churches are less of Christians. The truth is founders of most Churches have their own set of rules, which in most cases have been laid to brighten the chances of their members getting to heaven (I’m not talking about Biblical doctrines which are already clearly stated. Please, don’t get me wrong). But, it doesn’t necessarily mean those in other Churches who don’t keep such rules are condemnable. It is quite unfortunate that this has been the basis of most misunderstandings among Christians. There are bad Churches, I know. There are many false teachers out there also and we should be very cautious where we find ourselves. That is exactly why we should hold on to the Bible than the words of any man.

I’m not talking about Churches established by false teachers. Rather, I’m dealing with Churches that stand on the true word of God. That’s what gets me worried. John Wesley once wrote “Are you persuaded you see more clearly than me? It is not unlikely that you may. Then treat me as you would desire to be treated yourself upon a change of circumstances. Point me out a better way than I have yet known. Show me it is so, by PLAIN PROOF OF THE SCRIPTURES.”

So, what could be some of those ulterior motives why people really want to know what Church we attend? I suggested some in my introduction, but I wouldn’t know if you feel same way. So I can’t really say, but what I do know is that some employers practically favour members of their Churches when it comes to employment or promotion; some lecturers favour students who attend same Church as they do; some churches wouldn’t allow Christians from other Churches get married to their members unless, of course such person becomes a member. Need I tell you many love stories have ended based on this premise? No matter how sound doctrines of other Churches are, they belief theirs is second to none.

Let me end this with the words of Apostle Paul in his letter to the Corinthians: “And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law; 21 To them that are without law, as without law, (being not without law to God, but under the law to Christ,) that I might gain them that are without law. 22 To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some. 23 And this I do for the gospel’s sake, that I might be partaker thereof with you. 1 Cor 9:20-23 (KJV)”

THE BEST OF ALL NAMES

THE BEST OF ALL NAMES

I heard only the other day about a list of names given not long ago to a little girl. It began, Rachael, Oluwafunmilayo, Dorcas, Theresa, Immaculata, Tomilola; and so it went on to some fourteen or fifteen names, all for one little baby girl. These days, everyone present at a naming ceremony wants to give a name to the newly born child. Our names are very little things, and so are we that the names belong to, but they have a meaning and yet they are so great (contradicting?). Jephthah  means “God opens;” Oluwanisola means “It is God who enriches;” John means “the gift of God;” James means “the supplanter;” William means “the shield of many;” Charles means strong; Richard means liberal; David means beloved; George means a farmer or husband man; Francis means free; Samuel means a prophet-one who hears from God; Mary means either exalted or bitter; Magaret means a pearl, precious; Jane means gracious; Ann means merciful; Lucy means light, clear; Helen means shinning light; Elizabeth means the oath of God. Our names are very little things. They are like little vessels of water, into which you can dip your finger to the bottom, and tell how deep they are in a moment; yet they could be so powerful.

Have you ever wondered why some girl named Joy appears to be gloomy all the time, or some guy named Lucky seems to be so unlucky; another girl named Hope looks so hopeless; Innocent is ever guilty?. On the other hand, some person named Oluwanisola is so wealthy that his company Eleganza was such a household name. So, you see sometimes you feel these names have effects, while some other times it seems so meaningless. If names didn’t have meanings or effect, why would Nebuchadnezzar ask Ashpenaz to change the names of Daniel (God is my judge) to Beltshazzar (Beltis protect the king); Hananiah (Jah who is gracious) to shedrach (tender); Mishael (Who is like God?) to Meschach (that draws with force) and Azariah (Jah has helped) to Abednego (servant of Nebo). There is also another angle to this, most Christians remember these Hebrew children, especially the three: Shedrach, Mescach and Abednego by their Chaldean names and not by their Hebraic names. Does this say anything at all? I think it does and what it says is that we often value names by the achievements made by first bearers we ever heard of, irrespective of the true meaning of the name. Booker T. Washington named himself Washington, just because he needed a surname like other children and the only name that came to his mind was that of George Washington, because his mother often read of him when he was younger.

Few years ago, a number of parents named their newly born children Goodluck, because a certain Goodluck Jonathan rose to power in the most unlikely fashion. Nigerians said his name was pivotal in his success. But again, I want to believe a number of Goodlucks must have brought their parents, relatives and communities badluck in the past. So, if the name itself is beautiful and the bearer is not worthy of emulation, then the name becomes bad altogether. Will you go ahead to name your child Lucifer? But why not? It’s such a beautiful name with a great meaning.I’ve thought about this for some time and I’ve discovered that there is one name – the best name. This name was given to an individual who served the purpose of his name and even if some person doesn’t know the true meaning of the name, they can guess the true meaning on hearing of his deeds.

I dare say you have all read the story of the ‘forty thieves’. I believe you remember how the wonderful word “sesame” opened the door – “open sesame!” and instantly the door flew open, and he went in. the he gazed in wonder on all the precious things which were gathered together. Then he filled his panniers with gold and silver, and went home a rich man. How I wish I had a name is this powerful. I’m getting distracted already. Actually, I was talking about the best name; a name which is above every name (Phillipians 2:9). Just like the little girl I started with, he had many other great names. He is called the Christ, the Messiah, the Redeemer, the Morning star, the Sun of Righteousness, the Lily of the valley, the Rose of Sharon, the Balm of Gilead; and many other titles are applied to him. Indeed almost everything useful and beautiful is used in the Bible to represent some part of the character of Jesus. But, out of all these, the name which God chose to give him at his birth, and the name which He most loves His people to use when praying to Him, or speaking of Him is the name of Jesus. This is the BEST OF ALL NAMES. Why do I say it’s the best?

The first reason for this is, because it is so simple – It is a very little word (two syllables) of but five letters. It is best, in the second place, because it is so full of meaning – It is a little name, but at the same time it is a great name. it is both little and great. The third reason why it is the best name in the world is, because it is so full of power. Oh, there is wonderful power in it! When the apostles were on earth they went about casting out devils, and doing many wonderful works; and it was by the name of Jesus they did them all. Jesus said, when he was on earth, “Whatsoever ye shall ask the father, in my name, He will give it you.” There is but one reason more I will give you why the name of Jesus is the best name, – and that is, because it never changes – Women change their names when they are married; and there are many other circumstances which lead people to have their names changed.

Do you know the meaning of your name? I would really love to know. Also, think of any other reason you feel the name of Jesus is the best of all names.

Thanks.

The ‘WHY ME?’ Question

WHY ME?
The question may not be the best one, but it is a natural one and an important one too.
‘Why me?’ asks a question that expects an answer. It is an appeal to reason. It is a question that implies there is order in the word, a mind behind the universe – a controlling power. If there wasn’t such power, our questions would be directed to the empty air and the only ‘answer’ is a ‘mechanical’ description.
It is visiting time at the Epe General hospital. In the main ward little groups of people are gathered around patients’ beds. In one bed there is a man who is going home tomorrow. He is full of plans for taking up the threads of his interrupted life and the group around him is a gay one.
Yet lying in the next bed is a young fellow, pleasant looking, and well cared for – and yet dying. Why should this happen to him?
Sudden death comes to a house, a lingering illness, terminal diseases, an earthquake, or financial disaster. My child, my house, my job, my car. Why me?
Sometimes we ask the question as a way of blaming ourselves for our actions, but this raises the important question: what about the suffering of the innocent? In an innocent and blameless way a man can carry a polio virus or tubercle bacillus that can kill his neighbor’s child. In the case of venereal diseases, the woman may be the unknowing victim of her husband’s amorous escapades. The husband squanders his wages and the wife and children starve. The examples could be multiplied; so often it is the innocent person that suffers.
Again, what do we say about the suffering of whole groups of people? In the Ikeja bomb blast, Lagos Nigeria on 27th January 2002, many people were killed. Did they all deserve that? There were bad people in Ikoyi, Victoria Island, Lekki too. In Nagasaki, Japan after the atom bomb was dropped in 1945, people were killed, burnt, blinded, and sterilized. Was this just the man’s inhumanity to man, or something else? Certainly there were bad Japanese, but did they really deserve that? There were bad British, bad Americans, and bad Africans too.
Here is the problem. Men suffer, innocent and guilty alike.
I started by asking, ‘why me?’
What about saying we cause our own pains and sufferings…
Causes of Suffering
Man has spent much time and trouble during the centuries inventing ingenious ways of torturing his fellow men. He has invented the rack and the thumbscrew, electrical shock machines and rubber truncheons, and has now progressed to brain washing. Man’s capacity to cause suffering is endless.
But there are more personal ways of causing suffering than by the use of such instruments as a rubber truncheon or a gun. In the home a husband and wife can find countless ways of making each other’s lives a misery, either with constant, deliberate nagging or, less intentionally, through selfish and undisciplined living.
For some people life means suffering, unrelieved misery and semi-starvation from birth to death. For others it may be confined to some brief experience such as a prison sentence or an unhappy school; yet basically there are three main causes of suffering which come to man.

1. Self-induced Suffering.
Lungs cancer from smoking, diseases from casual sex, imprisonment from murder and so on.
There are even more common ways in which a person injures himself. For example, he worries ‘If only I had done that’. ‘What shall I do if this occurs’?
We sometimes forget that anxiety, depression and much nervous illness are also diseases, in the same way that measles is a disease.
2. Suffering caused by someone.
‘It wasn’t my fault,’ you say, ‘he started it.’
True!
Not all suffering is self-induced. We see reports in our newspapers, social handles, and online newspapers of too much horror caused by other people. Others can make us suffer, and we can make others suffer, as well.
3. ‘Acts of God’
Lawyers and insurance companies use this phrase ‘Acts of God’ to describe disasters and tragedies which cannot be explained in human terms. Hereditary diseases, draughts and earthquakes are three examples of this, as they are outside man’s control. Yet it may be that in a few more years we shall know enough about these natural disasters and the laws controlling them to be able to avoid their effects, or even control them. When we have further understanding of the ‘genetic code’ we may be able to prevent congenital illness – and, in fact, ‘genetic engineering’ is already a frightening responsibility.
We tend to reason that anything we cannot understand is due to God’s action; the result is that as more facts about the working of the universe are discovered, the more our concept of God shrinks! In actual fact, everything that occurs is an ‘Act of God’ or is permitted by Him. Perhaps it would be better to call these disasters ‘Inexplicable Acts of God’.
It might be added here that the acts of the mentally sick come into this ‘inexplicable’ character. Also the responsibility of many criminals may not be easy to assess in the light of modern research into criminal behaviour.
© Jephthah Iyaro 2014

WHY I HATE RELIGION BUT STILL ENAMOURED WITH GOD

I hate religion!

I love God, I love God’s creations and his creatures, I love the Church and I love His word among other things, but what I have problems with is ‘religion’. Religion has found its way into destroying the Church and the society at large.

Religion keeps people from living their lives to the fullest. It makes people feel guilty about things they shouldn’t feel about; worry about things they shouldn’t worry about.

You see what religion does is making people spend so much time appeasing the ‘higher power’ and in the end it’s so much wasted effort. This causes a big problem which leads to worshippers of God becoming easily enamoured with their own plans. If we are attempting to do noble or difficult things, we assume that we must be experiencing the maximum potential for our lives and that God must, therefore be pleased with us. All lies!

Nigerian churches have their own set of rules. Some have rules like: no movies, no dancing, no eating of meat, no creaming of the body and whatnot. In as much as we should be modest, it’s what is inside the person that matters; not the outside rituals. Like I heard in a movie I watched recently, ”You could dress a woman in concrete black and men would still find ways to lust after her. The trouble is what is on men’s heart, not what is on the woman’s body.”

Religion has so far become an excuse for slavering and discrimination. It causes so much superstition and makes people think they have to run away from God before they can live a normal life while self righteous leaders keep focusing on their own rules. Religion makes people stop being who they really are. They start keeping some impossible rules. They feel miserable!

Distancing themselves from important people in their lives because they start to believe people who don’t believe what they do would lead them astray. Instead of being more loving, religion makes them isolate themselves from people they really care about.

I love God because He cares less about religion. The same reason Jesus Christ had problems with the Pharisees. Remember?

Do I sound stupid? Well, I think sincere words shouldn’t sound stupid.

WHY I HATE RELIGION BUT STILL ENAMOURED WITH GOD

I hate religion!

I love God, I love God’s creations and his creatures, I love the Church and I love His word among other things, but what I have problems with is ‘religion’. Religion has found its way into destroying the Church and the society at large.

Religion keeps people from living their lives to the fullest. It makes people feel guilty about things they shouldn’t feel about; worry about things they shouldn’t worry about.

You see what religion does is making people spend so much time appeasing the ‘higher power’ and in the end it’s so much wasted effort. This causes a big problem which leads to worshippers of God becoming easily enamoured with their own plans. If we are attempting to do noble or difficult things, we assume that we must be experiencing the maximum potential for our lives and that God must, therefore be pleased with us. All lies!

Nigerian churches have their own set of rules. Some have rules like: no movies, no dancing, no eating of meat, no creaming of the body and whatnot. In as much as we should be modest, it’s what is inside the person that matters; not the outside rituals. Like I heard in a movie I watched recently, ”You could dress a woman in concrete black and men would still find ways to lust after her. The trouble is what is on men’s heart, not what is on the woman’s body.”

Religion has so far become an excuse for slavering and discrimination. It causes so much superstition and makes people think they have to run away from God before they can live a normal life while self righteous leaders keep focusing on their own rules. Religion makes people stop being who they really are. They start keeping some impossible rules. They feel miserable!

Distancing themselves from important people in their lives because they start to believe people who don’t believe what they do would lead them astray. Instead of being more loving, religion makes them isolate themselves from people they really care about.

I love God because He cares less about religion. The same reason Jesus Christ had problems with the Pharisees. Remember?

Do I sound stupid? Well, I think sincere words shouldn’t sound stupid.